Discovery of Massachusetts Mineral & Stones in Shelburne Falls

What a Rocky World We Live In!

The Connecticut Valley Mineral Club is a group of amateur collectors, mineralogists and professors of geology. They promote geology, mineralogy, the lapidary arts, paleontology and educational programs for elementary school age children by giving mineral presentations that showcase the importance of rocks and minerals in our everyday lives. Think curbs around town: granite. And computers: they are pretty important, right? Gold, silica, nickel, aluminum, zinc, iron, and thirty other minerals besides go into their construction. (Photo credit: Sienna Wildfield)

Just look around you, or down where your feet are scuffling along. What do you see? Rocks, lots of rocks—little gritty pebbly ones and big unbudging ones. Where do they come from? What are their names? What makes some of them so pretty, so valuable even? And who cares?

Well, rocks are actually very important in our lives and the Connecticut Valley Mineral Club will be delving into all things rocky, and explaining their value to us, at the Arms Library’s Rock Talk on Friday, August 9 at 6:30pm in Shelburne Falls.

This talk is one of the final programs in the “Dig Into Reading” Summer Program for youth; however, the program is sure to be entertaining and informative for all ages…

The Connecticut Valley Mineral Club is a group of amateur collectors, mineralogists and professors of geology. They promote geology, mineralogy, the lapidary arts, paleontology and educational programs for elementary school age children by giving mineral presentations that showcase the importance of rocks and minerals in our everyday lives. Think curbs around town: granite. And computers: they are pretty important, right? Gold, silica, nickel, aluminum, zinc, iron, and thirty other minerals besides go into their construction.

Along with presentations, their Education Committee presents area schools with a special mineral collection housed in an attractive glass display case along with supporting educational literature. The collection contains official Massachusetts State rocks, minerals and fossils from locations all around the State. And what is the state rock? Roxbury Puddingstone. Yep, it looks almost as funny as its name. To date the Connecticut Valley Mineral Club has touched the lives of hundreds of enthusiastic youth covering sixteen towns in Western Massachusetts.

Join other families to explore the amazing world of rocks, stones, pebbles and minerals, in the lower level Langford Room at the Arms Library in Shelburne Falls. Information: 413-625-0306, or, armslibrary.org

– Submitted by Laurie Wheeler

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